Skip To Main Content

COVID-19 Updates and Resources. Learn More

The Low-Glycemic Approach to Healthy Eating

Everything old is new again.

The latest buzzword in nutrition may be “low glycemic". You’ve probably heard the term “low glycemic” bandied about in the media and in discussions about weight loss. You may have even come across some food products labeled as such.

It’s All About Sugar

“Glycemic” simply means “relating to sugar.” The higher the glycemic impact of a food (more about this below), the greater and more rapid its effect on your blood sugar when you eat it—and the more insulin required to return your blood sugar to normal. Since insulin is a fat-storage hormone and since overweight people often already produce too much of it, high blood sugar and high insulin can sabotage your weight-management and better health efforts. Eating lower glycemic foods is definitely the way to go.

But how do we measure the glycemic impact of foods containing carbs? And how does that translate into deciding what to eat and what to pass up?

The Glycemic Index...

The first ranking, known as the glycemic index (GI), measured the relative impact of carbohydrate foods on blood sugar. The GI of a particular food is determined by comparing the effect of a 50-gram portion on blood sugar to that of a 50-gram standard such as a glucose solution or white bread1. The higher a food’s GI, the faster and greater its effect on your blood sugar. Although the connection between high-sugar diets and obesity and diabetes has been obvious for some time, recent research has also shown a connection between high-glycemic diets and both cardiovascular disease and cancer2, 3, 4.

The Glycemic Load

The glycemic load (GL) improves on the measuring process of the GI. Because it takes portion size into account, it gives a more accurate reading.

Glycemic Impact of Atkins Advantage Products

Atkins Advantage nutrition bars and shakes are low-glycemic impact . A patent-pending clinical testing method substantiates the low glycemic impact and confirm the accuracy of the Atkins net carb labeling claims.

Selected References:

1. Foster-Powell, K., Holt, S.H., Brand-Miller, J.C., “International Table of Glycemic index and Glycemic Load Values: 2002.” Am Journal of Clinical Nutrition, July, 2002; 76(1):5-56.

2. Dickinson, S., Brand-Miller, J., “Glycemic Index, Postprandial Glycemia and Cardiovascular Disease.” Current Opinions in Lipidology, 16 (1), pages 69-75, 2005.

3. Brand-Miller, J.C., “Glycemic Index in Relation to Coronary Disease.” Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 13(Suppl), page S3, 2004.

4. Michaud, D.S., Fuchs, C.S., Liu, S., et al, “Dietary Glycemic Load, Carbohydrate, Sugar, and Colorectal Cancer Risk in Men and Women.” Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers Prevention, 14(1), pages 138-147, 2005.

Try Keto – The Atkins® Way

Atkins keto plans are more flexible and more personalized to provide a long-term plan for reaching your goals. Our free tools can help you even further.

Get Started

Learn More About Low Carb Articles & Research

Easy Meals to Make Ahead and Freeze

In our busy lives, planning and preparing three meals a day can be quite stressful.

Read More »

List of Foods You Can Eat on Keto

Atkins is a type of ketogenic diet —a nutrition plan that’s high in fats, moderate in protein, and low in carbs.

Read More »

A Week of the Keto Diet: 7-Day Keto Meal Plan

The goal of a ketogenic diet—a nutrition plan high in fats and low in carbs—is to help you lose weight more efficiently by achieving ketosis.

Read More »

How to Start a Keto Diet: 7 Tips for Beginners

If the tenets of a  keto diet —high in fats and low in carbs—sound familiar, you’re not wrong.

Read More »

This site uses essential cookies to function. It also uses non-essential cookies for marketing and advertising. For more information please see ourPrivacy Policy.

This site uses essential cookies to function. It also uses non-essential cookies for marketing and advertising. For more information please see ourPrivacy Policy.

Close button